Interactive Design-Gallery Write-up Circle and Square

On Tuesday, April 18, I viewed the Circle and Square exhibition at the Cohen Gallery consisting of vase like statues made by William Underhill. The statues have different geometric shape forms or designs combined to make interesting structures.

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Within the works were two very intriguing structures that if we think in html would be considered part of a class that had a separate id for the differences. The one on the right is titled Sid’s Flaring Form (1962) made in bronze and to the left is Wide Flaring Form (1971) also formed from bronze. The difference in texture between the bases and the cyclone like forms on top with the jagged edges just seem to grab your eye

IMG_5670.JPGThe bronze Second Platonic Vessel (2004) seen bellow at first glance shows the age and tarnish of its years with a bright shiny divot in the center. But when I look closer I can see the combination of two forms that have mashed together. Observing the rectangles that make up the legs of the half sphere you can see them as the continuation of the raised square on the top as if at one point it was a complete form. The top of the statue makes me think of the dives in HTML where the content is surrounded by the padding, that is incased by the boarder, that resides inside the margin.

IMG_5669.JPGThe extruding forms and excluded portions of the complete forms in many of the statues can be thought of in an design aspect in Maya. Usually when starting out you use simple shapes like spheres and cubes as bases to your model then through the combinations of extruding and deleting you make a 3D model you need. Looking through this exhibition I have found myself wondering how I could do similar combinations of shapes to create such simple yet complex forms as well as using textures to separate combined forms for a more dynamic look.

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About dercks

Shelby is a student at Alfred State College in Digital Media and Animation.
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